Irving Penn

Hamiltons Gallery represented Irving Penn and later his Foundation for over thirty years. The gallery still works closely with his pictures and has a number of works available from various collections. Irving Penn is one of the most important modern masters of photography. He inspired future photographers of all genres with his portraits, still lifes and fashion pictures. He worked as a magazine photographer for Vogue and created numerous personal projects. His work forms significant parts of the world’s most renowned public and private photography collections.

<span class="title">Gerbera Daisy / Gerbera Asteraceae, New York<span class="title_comma">, </span></span><span class="year">2006</span>
<span class="title">Iceland Poppy/Papaver Nudicaule (G), New York<span class="title_comma">, </span></span><span class="year">2006</span>
<span class="title">Peony/Paenoia: Silver Dawn, New York<span class="title_comma">, </span></span><span class="year">2006</span>
Irving Penn
Gerbera Daisy / Gerbera Asteraceae, New York, 2006
Pigment print mounted to board
17 x 15 5/8 in.
Edition of 17
© The Irving Penn Foundation

Penn started to photograph flowers in 1967 after being commissioned by Vogue USA to illustrate their Christmas edition with images of tulips. This became the first of seven issues which Penn would illustrate with different genera of flowers. The photographs were collectively published as a book, ‘Flowers’, published in 1980. Penn later revisited the idea of flowers in the 1990’s and early 2000’s, using flowers as a metophor for his older age and the beauty which can be found in the expiring bloom.

 

In total, Mr. Penn editioned 42 different images of flowers throughout his lifetime. All 42 were exhibited for the first and so far only time in 2015 at Hamiltons Gallery, at which point Hamiltons and The Irving Penn Foundation published a catalogue raisonné of the series as well.

David Campany, who wrote the essay for this publication, writes of these pictures:


“Each flower was entirely individual, and when two or more appeared in the same photograph they only served to heighten one another’s particulars. Penn was not looking for examples that were representative of their species, nor compiling a botanical guidebook or taxonomy. Each photograph is a unique encounter with a unique thing in all its unsettling wonder.”